Both live and closed captioning provide a way to transcribe audio for people who are deaf or hard of hearing. The main difference between the two is that live captioning is done in real-time, while closed captioning is done after the fact.

In this article, we will go over the key differences between live and closed captioning, as well as when you might use one over the other.

What Is Live Captioning?

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Live captioning is a type of transcription that is done in real-time. This means that someone is transcribing the audio as it happens as the most common methods of live captioning are using a stenotype machine or speech-to-text software.

Live captioning can be useful in a number of situations, such as:

  • When you want to provide captioning for a live event, such as a speech or a webinar.
  • When you want to provide captioning for a conversation, such as an interview.
  • When you want to provide captioning for a video that does not have closed captions.

The Key Advantage Of Live Captioning

The key advantage of live captioning is that it can be done in real-time, which means that people who are deaf or hard of hearing can follow along with what is being said as it happens.

The main disadvantage of live captioning is that it requires someone to be transcribing the audio in real-time, which can be a challenge in some situations. For example, if there is a lot of background noise, it can be difficult for the captioner to transcribe what is being said.

What Is Closed Captioning?

Closed Captioning

Closed captioning is a type of transcription done after the fact. This means that someone transcribes the audio after recording it. Closed captioning is often done using speech-to-text software that shows high accuracy performance in contrast to other software, older, that is based on different technology.

Closed captioning can be useful in a number of situations, such as:

  • During a television program or movie, captions can provide dialogue, sound effects, and other audio information that might otherwise be missed by someone who is deaf or hard of hearing.
  • When you want to provide captioning for a recorded video.
  • When you want to provide captioning for a podcast.
  • When you want to provide captioning for a webinar or other live event that was recorded.
  • When you want to provide captioning for a conversation, such as an interview.

The Key Advantage Of Closed Captioning

The key advantage of closed captioning is that it can be done after the audio has been recorded, which means that the captioner can listen to the audio multiple times to ensure that they get an accurate transcription.

The main disadvantage of closed captioning is that it can take some time to transcribe the audio, which means that there can be a delay between when the audio is recorded and when the closed captions are available.

So, What’s The Main Difference Between These Two?

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Live captioning is a process of converting speech to text in real-time, while closed captioning involves the creation of text transcripts that are added to pre-recorded or live broadcasts. In both cases, the goal is to provide viewers with access to the audio content of a program.

However, live captioning is a more complex process that requires skilled stenographers to type out what is being said as it happens. Closed captioning, on the other hand, can be created using automatic speech recognition software or by transcribing a recording of the audio after the fact.

While live captioning is generally more accurate than closed captioning, it is also more expensive and time-consuming to produce. For this reason, many broadcasters choose to provide closed captioning instead of live captions.

Conclusion

Live captioning and closed captioning are both methods of transcribing audio into text. Live captioning is done in real-time, while closed captioning is done after the fact. Live captioning is more accurate but also more expensive and time-consuming to produce. Both live captioning and closed captioning have their advantages and disadvantages, and the decision of which to use depends on the needs of the broadcaster

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